Do you take this for granted? www.theshortesttallman.com

Do you take this for granted?

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So, the Tallest Tallman is a real cautious guy.  As in, he takes all home safety stuff seriously.  This guy’s a real Safety Sam.  I call my house Fort Knox, because of how secure he makes everything, between locking doors, internet security stuff, even surveillance.  One thing that I can’t argue with is the extra mile he goes with fire safety.

I know, this post is real fun stuff.

Anyway, I see way too often in the news that a house fire has destroyed a family, or at least destroyed their home.  My natural reaction is to think that, hey, I’m a responsible person with candles and electronics, I have smoke detectors, the chance of a house fire is really super slim for me.  As a matter of fact, I tend to think the cliche- “it can’t happen to me.”  Regardless of whether or not my family is at a low risk for a house fire, things can still happen.  Why not be super prepared??  There’s lots of things you can do to improve your fire safeness, certainly expensive things like buying the Nest products or installing a sprinkler system (ha!  Not for a typical residence. But I suppose you could.).

My husband, Safety Sam, just bought this device, the Kidde RemoteLync Monitor, that notifies you on your phone that a smoke alarm or carbon monoxide detector is going off on your home.  It’s more than what the standard home has, but it was fairly inexpensive and it’s pretty darn cool.

However, you can do 3 basic things that won’t cost you a lot of money.  At most, it’ll cost a few hundred dollars if you are really behind.

  1. Make sure your smoke detectors are interconnected.  I think this is a law now for new construction.  Nowadays, you don’t need wired connections anyway- it’s all wireless.  Also, smoke detectors are reliable for 10 years, so replace them after that.  Even if you think they work fine, wouldn’t you feel better knowing that they are still well within the warranty?  And, of course, change the batteries every 6 months (or buy the new ones with lithium batteries that are good for all 10 years!).

    Do you take this for granted? www.theshortesttallman.com

    How many do you have?

  2. Have an abundance of smoke detectors.  We have one in most rooms, including every bedroom.  Why not be super sure that you’ll wake up?  The guideline may be to have just one per floor and near sleeping areas, but why allow a fire any extra time to grow before the smoke finally reaches the smoke detector in another room?
  3. Have at least 2 fire extinguishers:  kitchen and bedroom.  Why not have one in the basement, too, near your furnace, etc.  These also have a shelf life, so check and make sure yours is still good.  A fire extinguisher will do you no good if it isn’t in top notch condition.  We even gave a set of fire extinguishers as a housewarming gift to a friend.  (Wouldn’t you be so lucky to be friends with ME??!  Ha!  I think it went over OK, we’re still friends!)

Listen, these are just our own personal ways we’ve tried to lower our risk of death and major loss due to a home fire.  By all means I’m no expert; check these web resources:

http://www.thewfsf.org/sap_usa_files/FEMA_StateSmokeAlarmRequirementsMay2010.pdf

http://www.kidde.com/home-safety/en/us/fire-safety/placement-of-smoke-alarms/

http://assembly.state.ny.us/member_files/005/20130731/index.pdf

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/politics/blogs/vote-up/2015/12/29/say-goodbye-battery-powered-smoke-alarms-ny/78012108/

Do you take this for granted? www.theshortesttallman.com

How many do you have?

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